A2 English Literature Love Through The Ages Coursework Columbia

Courses

ENGL 001 Critical Reading and Composition 3 Credits

Introduction to academic writing that supports a claim in respectful conversation with others. Topics drawn from important issues in the world in which students live. The course provides multiple opportunities to engage thoughtfully in the writing process. Students must receive a grade of C- or higher to advance to English 2.

ENGL 002 Research and Argument 3 Credits

Continuation of ENGL 1. Designed to refine the skills of argument and research. Students will make persuasive, thoughtful, and well-supported arguments in a variety of forms, including multi-modal genres. The course provides a number of occasions to think, research, and write about pressing issues of public concern. Must have a grade of C- or higher in English 1.
Prerequisites: (ENGL 001)
Attribute/Distribution: ND

ENGL 003 Composition and Literature I for International Writers 3 Credits

Students improve both their advanced academic written English and academic writing style through a process of reading fiction and non-fiction and by writing well-organized, coherent essays for academics. Author citation, style, and written fluency and accuracy are addressed within students’ writing. Enrollment is limited to nonnative speakers; prior academic writing history, English placement testing, and/or ESL director’s recommendation determines placement.
Attribute/Distribution: ND

ENGL 005 Composition and Literature II for International Writers 3 Credits

Continuation of English 3. Students practice more advanced methods and modes of writing for academics, including writing and reading for their specific field of study. Students continue to work on advanced written fluency and accuracy of idiomatic language and expression and are taught advanced methods of author citation and source integration.
Prerequisites: (ENGL 003)
Attribute/Distribution: ND

ENGL 011 Seminar in Critical Reading & Writing 3 Credits

English 11 is designed to deepen your skills in critical reading and writing through a close engagement with literary and cultural texts and advanced training in best writing practices. You will make persuasive, thoughtful, and well-supported arguments in a variety of forms.
Prerequisites: APEN or APES or ATWR or S07

ENGL 015 Speech Communication for International Speakers of English 1 Credit

Spoken English improvement through the practice of American English in “real contexts.” This course is for first or second year undergrads who have advanced English skills, but who need to improve their advanced communication and idiomatic language skills for the advanced speaking contexts of the American university classroom and campus. Advanced Spoken English accent improvement and academic presentations skills are also practiced as needed.
Attribute/Distribution: ND

ENGL 038 (AAS 038) Introduction to African Literature 3 Credits

Sub-Saharan African literary themes and styles; historical and social contexts, African folktales, oral poetry, colonial protest literature, postcolonial writing, and films on contemporary Africa.
Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

ENGL 050 (CLSS 050) Classical Mythology 4 Credits

Introduction to the study of the Greco-Roman myths in their social, political, and historical contexts. Equal emphasis on learning the myths and strategies for interpreting them as important evidence for studying classical antiquity.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

ENGL 052 (CLSS 052) Classical Epic 4 Credits

Study of major epic poems from Greece and Rome. Works include Homer’s Illiad and Odyssey, Apollonius’ Argonautica, Vergil’s Aeneid, and Ovid’s Metamorphoses.
Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

ENGL 054 (CLSS 054, THTR 054) Greek Tragedy 4 Credits

Aspects of Greek theater and plays of Aechylus, Sophocles, and Euripides in their social and intellectual contexts.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

ENGL 056 (CLSS 056) Topics in Greek and Roman Literature 4 Credits

Classical literature in translation, including themes or specific periods in Greek or Roman literature.
Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

ENGL 058 (CLSS 058, THTR 058) Greek and Roman Comedy 4 Credits

Study of comedy as a social form through plays of Aristophanes, Menander, Plautus, and Terence.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

ENGL 060 (THTR 060) Dramatic Action 4 Credits

How plays are put together; how they work and what they accomplish. Examination of how plot, character, aural and visual elements of production combine to form a unified work across genre, styles and periods. Recommended as a foundation for further studies in design, literature, or performance.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

ENGL 065 Introduction to Playwriting 4 Credits

An introduction to writing for the stage, with an emphasis on creating characters, maintaining tone, shaping metaphor, and using the resources available to theatre artists to a writer's best advantage. This course combines in-class exercises with seminar-style discussion of the student's work.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

ENGL 087 Themes in Literature 4 Credits

Study of a theme as it appears in several works of literature such as Love in the Middle Ages. May be repeated as content changes. Cannot be taken pass/fail.
Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.

ENGL 089 Popular Literature 4 Credits

The form of literature that has been designated in one way or another as "popular," such as folklore and detective fiction. May be repeated for credit as content changes. Cannot be taken pass/fail.
Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.

ENGL 091 Special Topics 1-4 Credits

A topic, genre, or approach in literature or writing not covered in other courses.
Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

ENGL 100 Working with Texts 4 Credits

A course to help students to become, through intense practice, independent readers of literary and other kinds of texts; to discern and describe the devices and process by which texts establish meaning; to gain an awareness of the various methods and strategies for reading and interpreting texts; to construct and argue original interpretations; to examine and judge the interpretations of other readers; to write the interpretive essay that supports a distinct position on some literary topic of importance; and to learn to find and assimilate into their own writing appropriate information from university library resources. To be rostered as early as possible in the English major’s program.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

ENGL 102 (AAS 102, JST 102, REL 102) Promised Lands: Jewish and African American Children's Literature 4 Credits

In the Hebrew Bible, Psalm 137 asks, “How can we sing the Lord’s song in a strange land?” For Jews, blacks, and black Jews, this was and is a poignant question. This course examines how these two rich, often overlapping and interacting groups tell their stories in literature for children and young adults, with a particular focus on the mediation of traumatic pasts. What does it mean to imagine promised lands beyond such pasts—and can they be reached?
Attribute/Distribution: HU

ENGL 104 (WGSS 104) Special Topis in Gender Studies 4 Credits

This course will involve extended study in a sub-area of English language culture, and literature with a focus on gender, sexuality, and/or race/ethnicity.
Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

ENGL 115 (HMS 115) Topics in Literature, Medicine, and Health 4 Credits

Largely focused on narratives about health, illness and disability, this course will examine individual experiences with attention to social context. Topics may include the physician/patient relationship, illness and deviance, plague literature, gender and medicine, autism, AIDS, mental illness, aging.
Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

ENGL 119 Introduction to the Horror Film 4 Credits

Examination of the horror film from beginnings to the present, including classic horror of the 1930s,the emergence of the slasher film in the 1970s, the self-reflexive horror of the 1990s, the faux-documentary horror at the end of the 20th century, and the virulent renaissance of the genre in our post 9/11 world, notably so-called "torture porn" and the return of the "possession" film. The course will ask fundamental questions about what we find horrifying, as well as particular questions about the changing shape of horror through the decades. The course will focus on U.S. film but wll sometimes include the highly influential horror traditions of other countries (for example, Germany, Japan, and Spain.).
Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.

ENGL 120 Literature from Developing Nations 4 Credits

Contemporary literature from Africa, Central America, South America, or Asia. Must have completed six hours of freshman English. Cannot be taken pass/fail.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

ENGL 121 (AAS 121) Topics in African-American Literature 4 Credits

Selected works of African American literature and/or the literatures of the African diaspora. Must have completed six hours of first-year English. Cannot be taken pass/fail.
Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

ENGL 123 American Literature I 4 Credits

American literary works through the mid-19th century. Must have completed six hours of freshman English. Cannot be taken pass/fail.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

ENGL 124 American Literature II 4 Credits

American literature from the middle of the 19th century to the present. Must have completed six hours of freshman English. Cannot be taken pass/fail.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

ENGL 125 British Literature I 4 Credits

British literature and literary history from Beowulf through the Pre-Romantics. Must have completed six hours of freshman English. Cannot be taken pass/fail.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

ENGL 126 British Literature II 4 Credits

British literature and literary history from the Romantic period into the 20th century. Must have completed six hours of freshman English. Cannot be taken pass/fail.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

ENGL 127 (THTR 127) The Development of Theatre and Drama I: Rituals to Romantics 4 Credits

Survey of theatre and dramatic literature from ritual origins to the 18th century.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

ENGL 128 (THTR 128) The Development of Theatre and Drama II 4 Credits

Survey of theatre and dramatic literature from the Renaissance to the present.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

ENGL 135 Playwriting II 4 Credits

For students interested in continuing and deepening their writing for the stage. Instructor approval required.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

ENGL 138 (AAS 138) Introduction to African American Literature 4 Credits

Survey of African American prose narrative and poetry from the 18th century to the present. Features writers from the Harlem Renaissance, the Black Arts Movement, and the post-Black Power era.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

ENGL 142 Introduction to Writing Poetry 4 Credits

Instruction in the craft of writing poetry, with a focus on prosody. Practice in and classroom criticism of poems written by students taking the course. Must have completed six hours of freshman English.
Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.
Attribute/Distribution: ND

ENGL 143 Introduction to Writing Creative Non-Fiction 4 Credits

Practice in writing non-fiction from immediate experience, with emphasis on accurate, persuasive description writing. Must have completed six hours of freshman English.
Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.
Attribute/Distribution: ND

ENGL 144 Introduction to Writing Fiction 4 Credits

Instruction in the craft of writing fiction. Practice in and classroom criticism of stories written by students taking the course. Must have completed six hours of freshman English.
Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.
Attribute/Distribution: ND

ENGL 155 The Novel 4 Credits

Selected novels, with attention to such matters as narrative, characterization, and cultural context. Must have completed six hours of freshman English. Cannot be taken pass/fail.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

ENGL 157 Poetry 4 Credits

Selected traditional and modern poetry, with attention to voice, form, and cultural context. Must have completed six hours of freshman English. Cannot be taken pass/fail.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

ENGL 163 Topics in Film Studies 4 Credits

History and aesthetics of narrative film. May be repeated for credit as subject varies. Must have completed six hours of freshman English. Cannot be taken pass/fail.
Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

ENGL 166 (THTR 166) The Playwright as Traveler 4 Credits

This class will read and analyze plays and critical essays to discern how playwrights navigate the tricky ethical and artistic enterprise that is travel. The material is challenging and will require students to utilize analytic tools culled from various disciplines including political economy, literary criticism, feminism and queer studies. We will focus on aesthetic devices that either foreground or obscure questions of politics, power, race, gender and class. Concepts such as ideology, orientalism, interpellation and hegemony will be covered.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

ENGL 170 Amaranth 1 Credit

Amaranth editorial staff. Students can earn one credit by serving as editors (literary, production, or art) of Lehigh’s literary magazine. Work includes soliciting and reviewing manuscripts, planning a winter supplement and spring issue, and guiding the magazine through all phases of production. Editors attend weekly meetings with the faculty advisor. Consent of department chair required.
Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.
Attribute/Distribution: ND

ENGL 171 Writing for Audiences 4 Credits

Practice in writing in a variety of discourse modes for different audiences. Consideration of the role of style, clarity, and careful observation in writing. Must have completed six hours of freshman English.
Attribute/Distribution: ND

ENGL 175 Individual Authors 4 Credits

Intensive study of the works of one or more literary artists, such as Austen, Hemingway, and Kerouac. May be repeated for credit as artists and works vary. Must have completed six hours of freshman English. Cannot be taken pass/fail.
Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

ENGL 177 Individual Works 4 Credits

Intensive study of one or more literary works, such as Moby Dick, and study of other major texts such as the Bible with attention to literary form. Must have completed six hours of freshman English. Cannot be taken pass/fail.
Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

ENGL 183 Independent Study 1-4 Credits

Individually supervised study of a topic in literature, film, or writing not covered in regularly listed courses. Consent of department chair required.
Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

ENGL 187 Themes in Literature 4 Credits

Study of a theme as it appears in several works of literature, such as Love in the Middle Ages. Must have completed six hours of freshman English. Cannot be taken pass/fail.
Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

ENGL 189 Popular Literature 4 Credits

The form of literature that has been designated in one way or another as “popular,” such as folklore and detective fiction. Must have completed six hours of freshman English. Cannot be taken pass/fail.
Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

ENGL 191 Special Topics 1-4 Credits

A topic, genre, or approach in literature or writing not covered in other courses. Must have completed six hours of freshman English.
Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

ENGL 201 Special Topics in Writing 1-4 Credits

Approaches not covered in other writing courses. Individual projects.
Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.
Attribute/Distribution: ND

ENGL 202 (GS 202, LAS 202, MLL 202) Latin American In Fact, In Fiction 4 Credits

This class couples a survey of Latin American literature in translation with an interdisciplinary approach to the study of Latin America. Departing initially from readings of literary and cinematographic works, our analyses will engage methodologies from multiple disciplines including history, sociology, and cultural studies. Accordingly, this course will examine critical developments in Latin American aesthetics along with the cultural climates in which they matured. This course assumes no prior study of Spanish, Portuguese, or Latin American culture.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

ENGL 222 (THTR 222) Readings in Non-Realism 4 Credits

Through close readings and analysis of a variety of non-realistic play scripts, this class catalogs what a grammar of non-realism might look like. Students will conduct close readings of non-realistic scripts that make use of the grammar available to the writer writing for the stage.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

ENGL 255 (THTR 255) The Collectively Devised Text 4 Credits

This class explores theater as a vehicle for civic engagement. Theater artists as varied as Moises Kaufman, the Civilians, Cornerstone, Culture Clash and Caryl Churchill have worked on scripts that were devised either in whole or in part collectively. Students will outline a plan for choosing a theme, identifying stakeholders, generating text and either writing or shepherding a full-length script to completion. Instructor approval required.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

ENGL 282 Professional Internship 1-4 Credits

Individualized work experience, on- or off-campus, in a field that a student of English wishes to explore as a career. Before registering, a student must meet with the internship adviser and obtain departmental approval. Internship credits do not count toward major in English. Sophomore standing and departmental approval required.
Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.
Attribute/Distribution: ND

ENGL 291 Special Topics 1-4 Credits

A topic, genre, or approach in literature or writing not covered in other courses.

ENGL 300 Apprentice Teaching 1-4 Credits

Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.

ENGL 301 Topics in Literature 3-4 Credits

A theme, topic, or genre in literature, such as autobiography as literature and the gothic novel.
Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

ENGL 302 (GS 302, LAS 302, MLL 302) Travel and Adventure in Latin American Fiction 4 Credits

Centering on a corpus of works presenting tales of travel and adventure, this class offers an overview of Latin American narrative genres (including “fantastic” narrative, magical realism, and postmodern fiction) from the mid 20th century to present day. Through close readings of works by Adolfo Bioy Casares and Roberto Bolaño, among others, and the analysis of filmic representations of travel in Latin America, we will examine differing modes of perceiving the region defined as Latin America.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

ENGL 303 Grimms' Fairy Tales: Folklore, Feminism, Film 3-4 Credits

This intercultural history of the Grimms' fairy tales investigates how folktale types and gender stereotypes developed and became models for children and adults. The course covers the literary fairy tale in Germany as well as Europe and America. Versions of "Little Red Riding Hood", "Cinderella", or "Sleeping Beauty" exist not only in the Grimms' collection but in films and many forms of world literature. Modern authors have rewritten fairy tales in feminist ways, promoting social change. Taught in English. German language students may receive a German component.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

ENGL 304 (WGSS 304) Special Topics in Gender Studies II 3,4 Credits

This course will involve extended study in a sub-area of English language, culture, and literature with a focus on gender, sexuality, and/or race/ethnicity.
Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

ENGL 305 Creative Writing Thesis Proposal 1 Credit

Preparation to write creative thesis. Requirements include writing a proposal and bibliography.
Attribute/Distribution: ND

ENGL 306 Creative Writing Thesis 3 Credits

Portfolio of original creative work in poetry, fiction, or creative non-fiction, plus introductory researched essay. Required for concentration in creative writing.
Attribute/Distribution: ND

ENGL 307 Undergraduate Thesis Proposal 1 Credit

to be enrolled by senior honors students preparing to write honors thesis. requirements include conducting preliminary research for the thesis and writing a detailed thesis proposal and bibliography. May not be rostered concurrently with English 308.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

ENGL 308 Undergraduate Thesis 3 Credits

Open to advanced undergraduates who wish to submit theses in English. Consent of department chair required.
Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

ENGL 309 Interpretation: Critical Theory and Practice 3-4 Credits

Introduction to recent literary and cultural theory, such as New Criticism, Structuralism, Marxism, Psychoanalytic approaches, Reader-response Criticism, Deconstruction, Feminist Theory, New Historicism, and Cultural Criticism.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

ENGL 310 Introduction to Methods of English as a Second Language Instruction 3,4 Credits

An introduction to teaching English as a second language including the theory and principles of second language acquisition, ESL methods, materials, and current trends such as computer assisted language instruction. With sufficient effort, students will learn to plan and teach an ESL/EFL class in the four areas of Writing, Reading, Speaking and Listening, choose appropriate materials for varying age and proficiency levels, and most importantly, have a concrete approach to teaching ESL/EFL. Required classroom observing and tutoring hours that can be completed in Lehigh’s ESL classes, in Lehigh’s ELLC language lab, or in the local public school ESL classes. restricted to upperclass and graduate students.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

ENGL 311 (WGSS 311) Gender and Literature 3-4 Credits

This course explores constructions of gender and sexuality in literature from different historical periods, traditions, and nationalities. How do female and male writers envision what it means to be a “woman” or to be a “man” at various moments in history and from various places around the world? How have gendered (and sexed) identities been shaped in various constraining and empowering ways in the literary imagination? What specifically gendered issues (such as love and violence) have been represented in literature? Content changes each semester.
Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

ENGL 312 Studies in Literary and Cultural Theory 3,4 Credits

Study of a particular contemporary theoretical approach to literature, film, or other cultural texts. .
Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

ENGL 314 Teaching English as a Second Language: A Practicum 1-4 Credits

Companion to English 310 (Intro to Methods of English as a Second Language). This course will include class meetings that focus on guided discussions of the practical application of principles and practices of ESL pedagogy in a real-world environment. Supervised ESL classroom student teaching required.
Prerequisites:ENGL 310
Attribute/Distribution: ND

ENGL 315 (HMS 315) Topics in Literature, Medicine, and Health 3-4 Credits

Analyzing the stories people tell about health, illness and disability, this course engages cultural studies approaches in order to explore the way those stories are told. Topics may include: illness and the graphic novel, the changing image of the healer in literature, collaborative storytelling with Alzheimer’s patients, end of life narratives, tales from the ER, narrative ethics.
Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

ENGL 316 Native American Literature 3-4 Credits

This course is a survey of the literary texts written by the indigenous inhabitants of what is now the United States, beginning with the myths and legends of the era before European contact and ending with the novels, poems, and films produced by Native Americans in the twentieth- and twenty-first centuries.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

ENGL 317 (REL 317) Topics in Jewish Literature 3-4 Credits

Selected topics in Jewish literature, which may include: Contemporary Jewish Literature, Philip Roth's Complaint, and Jewish Women Writers.
Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

ENGL 318 (AAS 318) African-American Literature and Culture 3,4 Credits

Topics in African-American culture and/or the cultures of the African diaspora. Topics may be focused by period, genre, thematic interest or interdisciplinary method including, for example, Nineteenth-century African-American Literature and Politics; African-American Folklore; Black Atlantic Literature; The Harlem Renaissance; and African-American Women Writers.
Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

ENGL 319 Advanced Studies in the Horror Film 3-4 Credits

Examination of the horror film from its beginnings to the present, including classic horror of the 1930s, the emergence of the slasher film in the 1970s, the self-reflexive horror of the 1990s, the faux-documentary horror at the end of the 20th century, and the virulent renaissance of the genre in our post 9/11 world, notably so-called “torture porn" and the return of the “possession” film. The will ask fundamental questions about what we find horrifying, as well as particular questions about the changing shape of horror through the decades. The course will focus on U.S. film but will sometimes include the highly influential horror traditions of other countries (for example, Germany, Japan, and Spain).
Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.

ENGL 321 History of the English Language 3-4 Credits

The phonology, grammar, and lexicon of English from its Anglo-Saxon beginnings to current World dialects, with a focus on the expressive literary effects of linguistic change.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

ENGL 323 Anglo-Saxon Language and Literature 3-4 Credits

An introduction to Anglo-Saxon language and culture, through Anglo-Saxon prose and short poetry, with special attention to the range of Anglo-Saxon genres and the problems of translation and interpretation.
Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

ENGL 324 Anglo-Saxon Poetry 4 Credits

The academic study of Music develops analytical skills, involves historical research, aural perception and creativity. The girls learn through listening and appraising, the scrutiny of musical scores, individual and group performance and composing. The academic Music team has extensive experience in historical study and analysis, composition, performance evaluation and harmony.

The Department runs regular masterclasses and workshops with expert musicians as well as talks in conjunction with the Music Society. We offer support and mentoring to elite musicians who play at an advanced level to help the girls balance their academic, practice and performance commitments. Many girls are also successful in open competitions, winning Choral Scholarships at Cambridge, and in gaining selection for the National Youth Orchestra.

Various competitions take place throughout the year including the Music Essay Competition, Competitive Music Festival and Annabel Choy Competitive Composition Concert. Concert trips are also organised and every year, girls attend the IGCSE World Music immersion day at SOAS (School of Oriental and African Studies), in London.

There is also a wide range of opportunities to play in small groups, sing in choirs and play in orchestras, with performance opportunities at School, locally, nationally and internationally.

For more information on the full range of extra-curricular opportunities available, please click here.

UIII-UIV (age 11-14)

Girls are introduced to significant figures, works and musical movements in the history of music from 16th to the 20th century. They develop the skills to understand and interpret musical scores, to discern aurally and describe interesting musical features using the appropriate terminology. The girls also undertake pastiche composition exercises, use specialist ICT-based notation software and develop keyboard skills. Our approach starts with sound and aims to foster an interest in and love for music of all styles, to encourage further study.

GCSE (age 14-16)

Skills of aural perception, historical understanding and score analysis are honed further during these years through the study of CIE IGCSE Music. Alongside the study of a wide range of Western Classical genres and world music, including set works, pupils learn how to compose complete pieces, and develop their understanding of performance with interpretative insight.

Find the GCSE syllabus here.

A level (age 16-18)

The three core skills of appraising, performing and composing form the basis of study in the Edexcel A level course. Girls deepen their appreciation of how composers in a wide range of genres manipulate the elements of music to achieve their goals, through detailed scrutiny of scores and recordings. In composition, they learn sophisticated ways of developing melodic and harmonic material within complex structures, and they prepare a recital for performance.

Find the A level syllabus here.

Staff List:

Mr Lawrence Tubb MA (Head of Department)
Miss Sarah McClure BMus, MA, FTCL (Assistant Head of Department)
Mrs Jo Devine, MMus
Mr Nick Robinson MA, LRAM

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