Cloning And Ethical Issues Essay

Ethical Issues Of Human Cloning Essay

The word "cloning" is commonly used in everyday communication to mean many different technological procedures. Cloning is more specifically defined as somatic cell nuclear transfer. Simply explained by Glenn McGee in his article Primer on Ethics and Human Cloning as "the starvation and subsequent implantation of DNA from one organism (e.g., cells specialized to make that organism's hair or milk) into an egg whose DNA nucleus has been removed. The resulting egg and nucleus are shocked or chemically treated so that the egg begins to behave as though fertilization has occurred, resulting in the beginning of embryonic development of a second organism containing the entire genetic code of the first organism," (........).This method was first harnessed in 1952. Further manipulation of the procedure provided the first mammal being cloned in 1996. A sheep named Dolly was created by Dr. Ian Wilmut form PPL Therapeutics and the Roslin Institute of Edinburgh, Scotland. Several more mammals proceeded Dolly including mice, cows, pigs, cats, rabbits, and a mule in 2003. While progressing leaps and bounds, cloning still provided many undesirable presentations. For example, Dolly was severally obese and died prematurely. Aged chromosomes during her creation is thought to be the cause of her unfortunate death. Many clones created have had complications with their immune system, lung, livers and like Dolly, many have been obese. Cloning has also proven to require nearly endless attempts to provide a full pregnancy resulting in a live mammal. In Dolly's case, she proceeded 277 failed pregnancies. Furthermore than physical complications, many other issues, both tangible and ethical, steadfastly accompany cloning.

Cloning, still being entirely experimental, is believed by some to be worthy of pursuit. In common and vain terms, human cloning could provide for the furthering of "perfect" people. For example, cloning all star athletes could make the perfect team to annihilate the competition at championship year after year. The devastated could once again hold their lost loved ones in their arms. On a more extreme level, an army of unstoppably strong, fierce, and firm clone soldiers could be created to fight and secure our freedom. As appealing as this sounds, there are unwavering qualities that shatter this reverie. A clone is nothing more than an exact copy of the original being's genes. And genes determine nothing more than appearance and make up. Moreover, genes do not determine us as humans entirely. Our raising, environment, experience, trials and errors, mold us into the psychological unique beings that we are. This fact stands true in both humans and animals. A tangible example of already existing evidence lies in those of identical twins. Both have the same DNA yet it becomes apparent as the twins develop that they remain very different in personality. Since twins are raised mostly together in the same environment with the same discipline and still grow...

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Essay about Ethical Issues of Human Cloning

2729 Words11 Pages

The word "cloning" is commonly used in everyday communication to mean many different technological procedures. Cloning is more specifically defined as somatic cell nuclear transfer. Simply explained by Glenn McGee in his article Primer on Ethics and Human Cloning as "the starvation and subsequent implantation of DNA from one organism (e.g., cells specialized to make that organism's hair or milk) into an egg whose DNA nucleus has been removed. The resulting egg and nucleus are shocked or chemically treated so that the egg begins to behave as though fertilization has occurred, resulting in the beginning of embryonic development of a second organism containing the entire genetic code of the first organism," (........).This method was first…show more content…

For example, cloning all star athletes could make the perfect team to annihilate the competition at championship year after year. The devastated could once again hold their lost loved ones in their arms. On a more extreme level, an army of unstoppably strong, fierce, and firm clone soldiers could be created to fight and secure our freedom. As appealing as this sounds, there are unwavering qualities that shatter this reverie. A clone is nothing more than an exact copy of the original being's genes. And genes determine nothing more than appearance and make up. Moreover, genes do not determine us as humans entirely. Our raising, environment, experience, trials and errors, mold us into the psychological unique beings that we are. This fact stands true in both humans and animals. A tangible example of already existing evidence lies in those of identical twins. Both have the same DNA yet it becomes apparent as the twins develop that they remain very different in personality. Since twins are raised mostly together in the same environment with the same discipline and still grow into two entirely different people proves that it is more likely that clones would be even further different than their original copy. (....) confirms this by saying "since environment has a profound influence on development, human clones likely would be different in terms of personality and other characteristics," (.....). He goes on to boldly say, "because

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